Know More About Hair Loss In Men

Common causes of patchy hair loss are: alopecia areata (patches of baldness that usually grow back) traction alopecia (thinning from tight braids or ponytails) trichotillomania (the habit of twisting or pulling hair out) tinea capitis (fungal infection). The amount and patterns of baldness can vary greatly; it ranges from male and female pattern alopecia (androgenic alopecia, also called androgenetic alopecia or alopecia androgenetica), alopecia areata, which involves the loss of some of the hair from the head, and alopecia totalis, which involves the loss of all head hair, to the most extreme form, alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all hair from the head and the body.

The problem of hair loss has resulted in many other myths and misconceptions. For instance, wearing hats does not “choke off” hair roots and promote baldness. Likewise, longer hair does not put a strain on roots. Most hair loss is not associated with systemic or internal disease, nor is poor diet a frequent factor. Thyroid disease can cause hair loss, but thyroid tests on people who have ordinary hair loss are usually normal. Although many medications list “hair loss” among their potential side effects, drugs are also not overall common causes of thinning or lost hair. On the other hand, with cancer treatments and immune suppression medications, hair loss is not uncommon.

Male hair loss is genetically determined (passed on from parents). Although a doctor can offer medical treatment to improve the condition, this may have side effects. Hair loss is not a disease but a very general problem wherein a poor diet is a frequent factor. Thyroid disease can cause hair loss, but thyroid tests on people who have ordinary hair loss are usually normal. Although many medications list “hair loss” among their potential side effects, drugs are also not overall common causes of thinning or lost hair. On the other hand, with cancer treatments and immune suppression medications, hair loss is not uncommon.

There are different stages in hair loss it starts from hair thinning and this condition called androgenic alopecia or “male pattern baldness” that occurs in adult male humans and other species. The amount and patterns of baldness can vary greatly; it ranges from male and female pattern alopecia (androgenic alopecia, also called androgenetic alopecia or alopecia androgenetica), alopecia areata, which involves the loss of some of the hair from the head, and alopecia totalis, which involves the loss of all head hair, to the most extreme form, alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all hair from the head and the body.

Alopecia can be treated in several ways but not all of them are successful. Some hair loss sufferers make use of clinically proven treatments such as finasteride and topically applied minoxidil (in solution) in an attempt to prevent further loss and re-grow hair. As a general rule, it is easier to maintain remaining hair than it is to re-grow; however, the treatments mentioned may prevent hair loss from Androgenetic alopecia, and there are new technologies in cosmetic transplant surgery and hair replacement systems that can be completely undetectable. There are durg-based treatments available that has been approved by the FDA.

Baldness is generally regarded as natural, and not a disease. So if a person decides they wish to try to get their hair back, they will probably have to pay for the lengthy, expensive procedure themselves.

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